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Boston and Beyond/Art & Entertainment: The Little Foxes Review

This review was originally Posted on Boston and Beyond/Art & Entertainment.

A fox hissing with a woman holding a fur scarf in the background

It has been said that, “blood is thicker than water,” but not with the seemingly genteel, Southern Hubbard family.

Craig Mathers drinking tea and Cheryl D. Singleton standing by him

States Addie, the black maid in Regina’s household,  “Well, there are people who eat the earth and eat all the people on it like in the Bible with the locusts. Then there are people who stand around and watch them eat it. Sometimes I think it ain’t right to stand and watch them do it.” This is a description that aptly surrounds three members of the Hubbard family. They are siblings that include the manipulative and scheming Regina, the cruel, abusive, and arrogant Oscar, and the possessive bachelor, Benjamin. They have decided to partner together to increase their already substantial, ill-gotten wealth that was built on the backs of the negro population. Only one road block exists that prevents the three acquiring millions. Regina’s terminally ill husband, Horace, is refusing to give them the $75,000 they need to make the transaction. The Lyric Stage at 140 Clarendon Street presents this engaging, classic, 20th century drama by the great American playwright, Lillian Hellman.  Directed by three time IRNE and four time Elliot Norton award-winner Scott Edmiston, the 150 minute story is so riveting that audience members seemed anxious to return to their seats after each intermission to continue the action filled tale that is rife with scheming, thievery, lying, murder and retribution through blackmail.

The cast sitting in the living room talking

 The production is set in an astoundingly beautiful design by four time IRNE and four time Elliot Norton award-winner Janie E. Howland**. The cast have been clothed in exquisite period costumes by IRNE award-winner Costume Designer Gail Astrid Buckley. Overhead, the lighting designs by Lighting design is by 3-time IRNE award-winner, Karen Perlow**further adds ambiance to the setting while cleverly creative and mysterious, original music by IRNE and Elliot Norton award-winner for Music and Sound Design by Dewey Dellay, provides excellent musical intro and transitions throughout the play.

Craig MAthers sitting down while Anne Gottlieb and Amelia Broome takl to him

The production features an impressive cast including IRNE and Elliot Norton award-winner Anne Gottlieb* as Regina Hubbard Giddens, the viciously ambitious sister of the Hubbard clan. IRNE award-winner Ameila Broome* performs as Oscar’s oppressed wife, Birdie;  Craig Mathers* is Horace, Regina’s ill husband.

 Will McGarrahan sitting on the couch with Michael John Ciszewski standing by him

IRNE award-winner Remo Airaldi* is Ben;  Will McGarrahan* is Oscar; Cheryl D. Singleton* is Addie, the faithful maid; IRNE award-winner Bill Mootos*is Mr. Marshall who the trio plan to do business with; Michael John Ciszewski is Leo, Oscar’s equally conniving son; Rosa Procaccino  is Alexandra, Regina’s daughter who becomes a pawn in the plot; and Kinson Theodoris is Cal, Regina’s houseboy.

Rosa Procaccino sitting in a chair with Anne Gottlieb standing over her

Variety called The Little Foxes, “A brilliant, blistering indictment of a rapacious southern family.” To find out if money will come out on top without destroying the family you may obtain tickets by visiting www.lyricstage.com/productions/the-little-foxes/

About The Little Foxes:

Lillian Hellman’s classic drama captures the riveting story of how a family’s vicious pursuit of financial success destroys the American Dream. In the post-Civil War South, Regina Giddens and her scheming brothers, Oscar and Ben, want to partner on a business deal to exploit the poor and increase their already substantial wealth. There is only one problem: Regina’s husband, Horace, refuses to give them the funds they need — setting in motion a vicious game of duplicitous dealings that ultimately leads to death. A timely story about corrosion of the soul and corruption of the heart.

Why³ with Scott Edmiston

We asked all of our directors this season the question “why?” Here are the answers from the director of our upcoming show, The Little Foxes!

Why The Little Foxes?

“Lillian Hellman was America’s first great female playwright, a feminist pioneer, and a moral force. Her work deserves to be seen, celebrated, and reconsidered. And it’s just a damn good story.”

Why at The Lyric Stage?

“Lyric Stage audiences LOVE American classics. They GET them. They Lyric Stage has become the go-to place in Boston for new 21st-century versions of great 20th-century plays”

Why now?

The Little Foxes was written in 1939. It is a cautionary tale about the danger of allowing greedy, dishonest, self-serving businessmen to take over your country. Hmmm… I wonder if it will still be relevant today?”

More about Scott Edmiston:

Scott Edmiston (Director) returns to the Lyric Stage where he recently directed the award-winning productions of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (2017 Elliot Norton Award) and My Fair Lady, (2016 Elliot Norton Award). Other Lyric stage credits: Light Up the Sky, Cat on a Hot Tin RoofWater by the Spoonful,Time Stands Still, My Name is Asher LevMiss WitherspoonThe Scene, Lobby Hero, and Private Lives. He has directed more than 60 Boston-area productions at SpeakEasy Stage, American Repertory Theatre, Huntington Theatre, and Underground Railway Theatre, among others. Highlights include Long Day’s Journey into Night, Constellations, Shakespeare in Love, The History Boys, Casa Valentina, The Light in the Piazza, Reckless, Five by Tenn, In the Next Room or the vibrator play, A Marvelous Party, and Betrayal. Six of his productions have received Elliot Norton Awards as Outstanding Production or Musical, and he has received four Norton Awards and three IRNE Awards for his direction. He is the recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award from Penn State, the StageSource Theatre Hero Award, and the Norton Prize for Sustained Excellence in Theatre. He is the author of “Acting Misbegotten: The Creative Journey to Eugene O’Neill” published in the anthology Critical Insights: Eugene O’Neill (Salem Press, 2012). Scott is a Professor of the Practice and Chair of the Department of Theatre at Northeastern University.

More about The Little Foxes:

Lillian Hellman’s classic drama captures the riveting story of how a family’s vicious pursuit of financial success destroys the American Dream. In the post-Civil War South, Regina Giddens and her scheming brothers, Oscar and Ben, want to partner on a business deal to exploit the poor and increase their already substantial wealth. There is only one problem: Regina’s husband, Horace, refuses to give them the funds they need — setting in motion a vicious game of duplicitous dealings that ultimately leads to death. A timely story about corrosion of the soul and corruption of the heart.

Lillian Hellman’s Regina Giddens: The Theatre’s Original “Nasty Woman”

June 19, 2017

Written by Sarah Rebell

When I set out to write a piece on The Little Foxes, I headed right to the Drama Book Shop in New York City, to browse and research all things Lillian Hellman. Shockingly, there were no biographies of her in stock or on order. She was not even included in the Drama Book Shop’s most basic book series outlining the lives of accomplished American playwrights. I perused Barnes and Noble and independent bookstores with large theatre sections, but all to no avail. The most recent Hellman biography (less than five years old and provocatively titled A Difficult Woman) was even hard to obtain on Amazon; I had to purchase it through a third party seller. Not only are Hellman biographies in short supply, so too are Hellman revivals. Her plays have only been brought back to Broadway six times total, as opposed to the 25 Broadway revivals for Arthur Miller, or the 31 Broadway revivals for Tennessee Williams. To this day, she has never won a Best Play or Best Revival of a Play Tony Award. The sixth and current Hellman revival is of her most acclaimed play, The Little Foxes, which is about the unconventional Southern matriarch Regina Giddens, who manipulates her brothers’ moneymaking scheme with grit, ambition, and business acumen.

Click Here to Read Full Article

Why³ with Director A. Nora Long | The Wolves

We sat down with Director A. Nora Long to learn what makes The Wolves one of the most impressive new plays in recent years!

Why is this play important?

There are few groups as universally-maligned as teenage girls. The vast majority of our pop culture representations portray them as vain, shallow, cruel, and vapid. Delappe affords us a nuanced, funny, thoughtful insight into the lives of young women, as they wrestle through the rather fraught process of growing-up, focusing on their humanity, in all its wonders and flaws, and their athleticism. Make no mistake, this is a play about a team of competitive athletes. These players are seeking immediate victories but also future security and college scholarships. Like soldiers preparing for battle, we see our heroes in moments of vulnerability and triumph, brash confidence and blistering defeat. And they keep coming back each Saturday for another shot at glory. It is a story of perseverance in the face of adversity, a celebration of the human spirit, and a showcase of the extraordinary abilities of the body.  In short, it is a great fucking play.

Why is the Lyric Stage the right fit for this play?

Young women are, by far, the largest demographic in the local casting pool. After spending years seeing thousands of brilliant actors for the odd part as the girlfriend, the daughter, or the broad in the tower, finding a beautiful story that plays to our community’s strengths was an obvious fit for Lyric Stage’s long-standing commitment to local artists. Lyric audiences have always prized rich, character-driven stories that offer them a unique perspective on the world. The Wolves is an astonishing play that does all that and more. Also, where else can you get the feeling of sitting pitch-side at the City Sports Dome indoor soccer field arena?

Why is this play important to do now?

It’s always the right time to do great plays, but as the national conversation seeks to be more inclusive of the experiences of under-represented groups, a play about young women as human beings and athletes feels particularly of the moment. If the future is female, have no doubt, the future is coming.

About The Wolves

January 11 – February 3, 2019

Left quad. Right quad. Lunge. A girls’ indoor soccer team warms up. From the safety of their suburban stretch circle, the team navigates big questions and wages tiny battles with all the vigor of a pack of adolescent warriors. As the author says, “I wanted to see a portrait of teenage girls as human beings – as complicated, nuanced, very idiosyncratic people, athletes and daughters and students and scholars and people who are trying actively to figure out who they are in this changing world around them.” 

The Wolves was a finalist for the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

“The scary, exhilarating brightness of raw adolescence emanates from every scene of this uncannily assured first play.”   – The New York Times

Special Event: Ode to Hayes

On Sunday December 9th and 23rd, Castle of our Skins, a concert and educational series that is dedicated to celebrating Black artistry through music, will present a tribute to Roland Hayes here at Lyric Stage. 

The celebration will include spiritual and art songs that were championed by Hayes and world premiere work that was created with youth in Boston. A reception will also follow.

The event will take place from 1:00-1:30 on both days and tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for seniors and children under 12.

About Breath & Imagination

Before there was Marian Anderson, there was Roland Hayes – one of the first world-renowned African-American classical vocalists.  Breath & Imagination is a play with music that chronicles the amazing journey of this pioneer from the plantation in Georgia to singing before kings and queens in Europe.   At the heart of the story is Roland’s loving, complex relationship with his mother – his Angel Mo’. Employing spirituals and classical music, Breath & Imagination is an inspirational exploration of one man’s determination to be an artist despite seemingly insurmountable odds.

A co-production with The Front Porch Arts Collective.

A winning, inspirational story of a man who found his freedom in song.” – WBUR, The ARTery

Why³ with Spiro Veloudos: The Roommate

We sat down with Spiro to learn more about why he chose to direct The Roommate this season!

Why this play? 
Jen Silverman is an amazing writer and this play seemed right for us. I also get to work with some of the wealth of women actors (of a certain age) here in Boston.

Why the Lyric Stage?
It’s my home and I love it when I can open the doors on a new play.

Why now?
In a world filled with stories about men, here we have a play written by a woman, telling the story of two specific women faced with the need to change, to rethink their lives, and hopefully, to find companionship. And it’s a comedy – how can you go wrong?

About The Roommate

Sharon, middle-aged and recently divorced, welcomes a roommate into her Iowa home:  Robyn, a free-spirited, mysterious lesbian slam poet from the Bronx who’s looking to start over.  But as Sharon begins to uncover Robyn’s secrets while sharing music, books, and an occasional toke, she discovers a deep-seated desire to transform her own life.

It’s a subversive, absorbing comedy about what it takes to re-route your life – and what happens when the wheels come off.​

“Deeply satisfying” – Boston Globe

“Tugs at the heartstrings and tickles the funny bone.” – Louisville.com

How Funny (Or Terrifying) Would It Be If You Tried To Turn Your Life Around?

Chatting with Adrianne  Krstansky and Paula Plum

What Lyric Stage shows have you appeared in before?
Adrianne Krstansky: Barbecue and November.
Paula Plum: Too many to count, starting in 1975 when I was still in college
and in one of the first Lyric Stage shows. And of course, many
directed by Spiro: Death of a Salesman, Sideman, 33 Variations,
Blythe Spirit.

What excites you about The Roommate?
AK: I’m very excited to work with Spiro for the first time. And I’m
really excited to be in a play about middle-aged women where
I’m not the wife or the mom.
PP: I always love Spiro’s take on gritty plays and I’m blessed to
be working with Adrianne as my scene partner.

What challenges do you find in the script?
AK: Robyn is challenging because she does not actually reveal
anything about herself until about halfway through the play.
I have to figure out how to stay open and available without
being duplicitous at the same time.
PP: Sharon is challenging because she seems like an open
book but her intentions are hard to figure out and she’s hard
to decipher. Is she naïve or is she a con?

Throughout the play, Robyn and Sharon make many
discoveries about the other that change who they are.
How has a roommate helped you to change?
AK: I had a roommate who was the queen of the party circuit
and every weekend we would have about 30-50 people in our
apartment. At these parties, I would pick one or two people
who I thought were cool and take them up to a crawl space in
the attic. What I learned how to do as a result of that is how to
become the cool, quiet person at the party.                                                       

 PP: My college roommate Eve — we were roommates 4 – 5
times — helped me renew my interest in meditation. And she
eats healthier. She was a good influence. I’m not sure Sharon
and Robyn are necessarily a good influence on each other.

What do you and your character from The Roommate
have in common?
AK: I think we’re both quiet thrill seekers. We’re both unassuming
enough that no one would ever suspect us of much. I would be
a great spy because no one would ever suspect me of anything
other than being a nice, unassuming person.
PP: Iowa! My father was from there and I spent 14 summers there.
And I think I’m impulsive. I am. And experimental.

What is something you hope the audience will look out for?
AK: I think we tend to label relationships that we are in (love,
parental, marriages, etc.) and what this play exposes is that there
are relationships in our lives that are beyond definition — and
that our instincts to label and put these interactions in a box
actually can keep us separated from each other.
PP: I hope that they’re drawn in to the mystery of this
relationship. Because it’s unique — it’s about two women who
really need each other.

How do you feel about working with each other?
AK: I love working with Paula Plum. Working with Paula is like
coming home.
PP: Adrianne is so deep, real, and honest. There’s not an ounce
of performance in her performance. You can always count on
the truth from her.


The Roommate opens October 19th. Get your tickets today here or 617.585.5678!

A First Look at the set of The Roommate

The cast just got a first look at the set of The Roommate. Enjoy this sneak preview! Scenic design by Jenna McFarland Lord.

Light chandelier in the kitchen of the Roommate set
Fruits and vegetables in a box on the kitchen counter in the set of The Roommate
Spices in the pantry on the set of The Roommate
The stove and kitchen counter in the set of The Roommate
Inside pf the fridge on the set of The roommate

The Roommate opens October 19th

Sharon, middle-aged and recently divorced, needs a roommate to share her Iowa home.  Robyn needs a place to hide and a chance to start over.  But as Sharon begins to uncover Robyn’s secrets while sharing music, books, and an occasional toke, she discovers a deep-seated desire to transform her own life completely.   It’s a subversive, absorbing comedy about what it takes to re-route your life – and what happens when the wheels come off.

Sitzprobe Photos

Kiss of the Spider Woman is almost here! Check out these photos from the sitzprobe, and get your tickets today at tickets.lyricstage.com or 617.585.5678.

101 – Kiss of the Spider Woman with Rachel Bertone

101 – Kiss of the Spider Woman with Rachel Bertone
Lyric Off Stage

 
 
00:00 / 13:53
 
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Join Kiss of the Spider Woman director and choreographer Rachel Bertone as she brings us behind the scenes into her planning, preparation, and vision for this production of Kander and Ebb’s smash musical in our very first episode of our new podcast, Lyric Off Stage!

You can also listen to this podcast on

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About Kiss of the Spider Woman

Fantasy and reality become tangled in a dark web in this smash musical by John Kander and Fred Ebb, the songwriting team that penned Chicago and CabaretKiss of the Spider Woman revamps a harrowing tale of persecution into a dazzling spectacle that juxtaposes gritty realities with liberating fantasies.  Cellmates in a Latin American prison, Valentin is a tough Argentine revolutionary and Molina is an unapologetic homosexual serving eight years for deviant behavior. Molina escapes from the terrifying reality of prison life by sharing his fantasies about a mysterious 1940s movie star who takes on the role of a Spider Woman who can kill with a kiss.

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