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November 2010

Recently, we've been studying the etiquette of Victorian England, and what it took to be a gentleman or a lady. Here's a hint: a lot. The Victorians were very concerned with how one behaved, and the rules for what one should and should not do were complex and detailed. Much of what we consider to be basic ideals

Watch video from The Nicholas Nickleby Rehearsal Center below! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2Y_1yW_YoE The ensemble of THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF NICHOLAS NICKLEBY rehearses narration for the production at The Nicholas Nickleby Rehearsal Center. The cast includes: Leigh Barrett, Daniel Berger-Jones, Peter A. Carey, Neil A. Casey, Sasha Castroverde, Larry Coen, Daniel Cohen, Michael Steven Costello, Jack Cutmore-Scott, John Davin, Janelle Day-Mills, Kerry

"To LONDON!"In a cavernous, almost empty, and very echo-y warehouse space in the South Boston Waterfront District on September 14th, 24 voices thundered that phrase in unison for the first time. It was about hour 4 of our first rehearsal, and Spiro had just finished his first "pencil sketch" of the opening scene. It was the perfect way to begin

An excerpt from the Stage Manager's report after the first rehearsal of The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby: We’re on our way! The meet ‘n’ greet at the top of rehearsal introduced our stellar cast to our brilliant staff and the myriad policies and procedures in place at the theatre. Moving right along into our designer presentations, Janie Howland was

Here we are – three weeks from the first rehearsal. And while this is the part of the process that many people generally think of as the beginning, it is not. For example, most people probably don’t realize how far in advance the design team begins working on a show. Our team has been furiously working for months

Many directing books suggest that the single most important thing a director does is cast their show. If you cast it well, much of the work is done for you. Make a mistake, and – well, let’s just say that everything becomes much more difficult. So how do you go about casting a play with over 150 named characters?