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Why³ with Director A. Nora Long | The Wolves

We sat down with Director A. Nora Long to learn what makes The Wolves one of the most impressive new plays in recent years!

Why is this play important?

There are few groups as universally-maligned as teenage girls. The vast majority of our pop culture representations portray them as vain, shallow, cruel, and vapid. Delappe affords us a nuanced, funny, thoughtful insight into the lives of young women, as they wrestle through the rather fraught process of growing-up, focusing on their humanity, in all its wonders and flaws, and their athleticism. Make no mistake, this is a play about a team of competitive athletes. These players are seeking immediate victories but also future security and college scholarships. Like soldiers preparing for battle, we see our heroes in moments of vulnerability and triumph, brash confidence and blistering defeat. And they keep coming back each Saturday for another shot at glory. It is a story of perseverance in the face of adversity, a celebration of the human spirit, and a showcase of the extraordinary abilities of the body.  In short, it is a great fucking play.

Why is the Lyric Stage the right fit for this play?

Young women are, by far, the largest demographic in the local casting pool. After spending years seeing thousands of brilliant actors for the odd part as the girlfriend, the daughter, or the broad in the tower, finding a beautiful story that plays to our community’s strengths was an obvious fit for Lyric Stage’s long-standing commitment to local artists. Lyric audiences have always prized rich, character-driven stories that offer them a unique perspective on the world. The Wolves is an astonishing play that does all that and more. Also, where else can you get the feeling of sitting pitch-side at the City Sports Dome indoor soccer field arena?

Why is this play important to do now?

It’s always the right time to do great plays, but as the national conversation seeks to be more inclusive of the experiences of under-represented groups, a play about young women as human beings and athletes feels particularly of the moment. If the future is female, have no doubt, the future is coming.

About The Wolves

January 11 – February 3, 2019

Left quad. Right quad. Lunge. A girls’ indoor soccer team warms up. From the safety of their suburban stretch circle, the team navigates big questions and wages tiny battles with all the vigor of a pack of adolescent warriors. As the author says, “I wanted to see a portrait of teenage girls as human beings – as complicated, nuanced, very idiosyncratic people, athletes and daughters and students and scholars and people who are trying actively to figure out who they are in this changing world around them.” 

The Wolves was a finalist for the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

“The scary, exhilarating brightness of raw adolescence emanates from every scene of this uncannily assured first play.”   – The New York Times

Job Opportunity: Managing Director

The Lyric Stage Company of Boston, is seeking an energetic, collaborative, and self-motivated individual for the position of Managing Director.

Summary

The Managing Director will be the Lyric Stage’s chief operating officer (COO) and will report to the Producing Artistic Director/CEO of the company for a one-year period, and to the Board of Directors thereafter. This is a key leadership role not only at the Lyric Stage but also in the cultural life of the Greater Boston Area and will be one of the public faces of the Lyric Stage. This individual will tend to the overall financial well-being of the organization, paying special attention to fundraising initiatives set by the Board of Directors. The successful candidate will share our passion for theatre, theatre arts education, and the Lyric Stage’s distinct and historic role in the cultural life of Greater Boston and must be comfortable with a small full-time staff (10 persons) and a fast-paced fun office environment. They must have an excellent sense of humor.

Requirements

The successful candidate will have a college degree and a minimum of five years of related management experience in nonprofit arts administration, theatre, or a related field. A successful track record in fundraising and leadership best practices is expected.

The Lyric Stage is committed to a diverse and inclusive work environment.  Application by any and all qualified candidates is encouraged.

Job Description

Finances: Have a high-level financial management acumen (including budgeting and budget management). With the Producing Artistic Director, ensure that the annual budget is prepared with input from all departments and approved by the Board. Ensure that the day-to-day operations are conducted to meet revenue and expense goals. Meet periodically with the staff and the Board to report results. Make recommendations to the Producing Artistic Director and Board for adjustments to plan for and accommodate changes. With the General Manager, ensure that expenses are paid on a timely basis and all accounts are in order. Work with the Lyric Stage’s auditor to prepare the annual audit, IRS filings, and all necessary reports to the state and federal governments. Explore financial instruments to maximize interest on accounts.

Fundraising: Set fundraising goals and budget with Board. Ensure that goals are properly addressed with events and activities that allow goals to be met. With Executive Committee of the Board and the Producing Artistic Director, work towards establishing an endowment. Seek corporate, foundation, and individual sponsors (including major gifts). Maintain lists of target donors for development. Explore opportunities for grants and complete proposals. Be an active participant in fundraising, working with the Board Development Committee and meeting with potential donors in all phases of development.

Strategic: With the Producing Artistic Director and the Board, develop or revise the mission statement. The Managing Director will be a member of the Board’s Strategic Planning Committee. Actively participate with the Producing Artistic Director. Associate Artistic Director and Marketing Director in season planning for maximum attendance results while balancing artistic goals. Work with the Producing Artistic Director and Marketing Director to develop target audiences, marketing plans, and the marketing budget to ensure robust ticket sales. Explore and develop opportunities for community outreach and partnerships.

Personnel: Attract and retain staff sufficient to meet budget and goals. Develop talent in key areas for continuity. They should consider themselves a mentor to other administrative positions (box office, general management, marketing, and development) in order to continue the cross-training of the staff to ensure smooth operations. With the Producing Artistic Director, set the tone for the office culture.

Other: The Managing Director should be a partner with the Producing Artistic Director/CEO of the company in its operations. The Managing Director should have good written and verbal communication skills, work well with staff in a transparent, collaborative manner, and be involved with the day-to-day operations of the staff. The Managing Director should be one of the recognizable faces and positions in the Lyric Stage family.  As such, they should be available at key performances (or at non-traditional office hours) to be in front of the audience and contacting key stakeholders. The Managing Director should attend meetings and gatherings within the theatre and cultural community. They should be a good negotiator and be the point person for the Lyric Stage for collective bargaining with the unions that the company currently works with (currently Actors Equity Association, Boston Musicians Union, Stage Directors and Choreographers, United Scenic Artists). Other duties assigned by the Board of Directors. They should have great people skills.

This is a full-time salaried position. Benefits include participation in a health plan, contribution to a 403-b plan administered by Fidelity Investments, a dental plan, pre-tax T-pass benefits, reciprocal free or discounted admission to most museums and cultural institutions throughout the Commonwealth, and a liberal paid time off policy.

Please submit a cover letter, current Resume and three references with their contact information to search@lyricstage.com. No phone calls, please.

Applications will be considered on a rolling basis. Please apply by February 1st, 2019.

Special Event: Ode to Hayes

On Sunday December 9th and 23rd, Castle of our Skins, a concert and educational series that is dedicated to celebrating Black artistry through music, will present a tribute to Roland Hayes here at Lyric Stage. 

The celebration will include spiritual and art songs that were championed by Hayes and world premiere work that was created with youth in Boston. A reception will also follow.

The event will take place from 1:00-1:30 on both days and tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for seniors and children under 12.

About Breath & Imagination

Before there was Marian Anderson, there was Roland Hayes – one of the first world-renowned African-American classical vocalists.  Breath & Imagination is a play with music that chronicles the amazing journey of this pioneer from the plantation in Georgia to singing before kings and queens in Europe.   At the heart of the story is Roland’s loving, complex relationship with his mother – his Angel Mo’. Employing spirituals and classical music, Breath & Imagination is an inspirational exploration of one man’s determination to be an artist despite seemingly insurmountable odds.

A co-production with The Front Porch Arts Collective.

A winning, inspirational story of a man who found his freedom in song.” – WBUR, The ARTery

Why³ with Spiro Veloudos: The Roommate

We sat down with Spiro to learn more about why he chose to direct The Roommate this season!

Why this play? 
Jen Silverman is an amazing writer and this play seemed right for us. I also get to work with some of the wealth of women actors (of a certain age) here in Boston.

Why the Lyric Stage?
It’s my home and I love it when I can open the doors on a new play.

Why now?
In a world filled with stories about men, here we have a play written by a woman, telling the story of two specific women faced with the need to change, to rethink their lives, and hopefully, to find companionship. And it’s a comedy – how can you go wrong?

About The Roommate

Sharon, middle-aged and recently divorced, welcomes a roommate into her Iowa home:  Robyn, a free-spirited, mysterious lesbian slam poet from the Bronx who’s looking to start over.  But as Sharon begins to uncover Robyn’s secrets while sharing music, books, and an occasional toke, she discovers a deep-seated desire to transform her own life.

It’s a subversive, absorbing comedy about what it takes to re-route your life – and what happens when the wheels come off.​

“Deeply satisfying” – Boston Globe

“Tugs at the heartstrings and tickles the funny bone.” – Louisville.com

How Funny (Or Terrifying) Would It Be If You Tried To Turn Your Life Around?

Chatting with Adrianne  Krstansky and Paula Plum

What Lyric Stage shows have you appeared in before?
Adrianne Krstansky: Barbecue and November.
Paula Plum: Too many to count, starting in 1975 when I was still in college
and in one of the first Lyric Stage shows. And of course, many
directed by Spiro: Death of a Salesman, Sideman, 33 Variations,
Blythe Spirit.

What excites you about The Roommate?
AK: I’m very excited to work with Spiro for the first time. And I’m
really excited to be in a play about middle-aged women where
I’m not the wife or the mom.
PP: I always love Spiro’s take on gritty plays and I’m blessed to
be working with Adrianne as my scene partner.

What challenges do you find in the script?
AK: Robyn is challenging because she does not actually reveal
anything about herself until about halfway through the play.
I have to figure out how to stay open and available without
being duplicitous at the same time.
PP: Sharon is challenging because she seems like an open
book but her intentions are hard to figure out and she’s hard
to decipher. Is she naïve or is she a con?

Throughout the play, Robyn and Sharon make many
discoveries about the other that change who they are.
How has a roommate helped you to change?
AK: I had a roommate who was the queen of the party circuit
and every weekend we would have about 30-50 people in our
apartment. At these parties, I would pick one or two people
who I thought were cool and take them up to a crawl space in
the attic. What I learned how to do as a result of that is how to
become the cool, quiet person at the party.                                                       

 PP: My college roommate Eve — we were roommates 4 – 5
times — helped me renew my interest in meditation. And she
eats healthier. She was a good influence. I’m not sure Sharon
and Robyn are necessarily a good influence on each other.

What do you and your character from The Roommate
have in common?
AK: I think we’re both quiet thrill seekers. We’re both unassuming
enough that no one would ever suspect us of much. I would be
a great spy because no one would ever suspect me of anything
other than being a nice, unassuming person.
PP: Iowa! My father was from there and I spent 14 summers there.
And I think I’m impulsive. I am. And experimental.

What is something you hope the audience will look out for?
AK: I think we tend to label relationships that we are in (love,
parental, marriages, etc.) and what this play exposes is that there
are relationships in our lives that are beyond definition — and
that our instincts to label and put these interactions in a box
actually can keep us separated from each other.
PP: I hope that they’re drawn in to the mystery of this
relationship. Because it’s unique — it’s about two women who
really need each other.

How do you feel about working with each other?
AK: I love working with Paula Plum. Working with Paula is like
coming home.
PP: Adrianne is so deep, real, and honest. There’s not an ounce
of performance in her performance. You can always count on
the truth from her.


The Roommate opens October 19th. Get your tickets today here or 617.585.5678!

A First Look at the set of The Roommate

The cast just got a first look at the set of The Roommate. Enjoy this sneak preview! Scenic design by Jenna McFarland Lord.

The Roommate opens October 19th

Sharon, middle-aged and recently divorced, needs a roommate to share her Iowa home.  Robyn needs a place to hide and a chance to start over.  But as Sharon begins to uncover Robyn’s secrets while sharing music, books, and an occasional toke, she discovers a deep-seated desire to transform her own life completely.   It’s a subversive, absorbing comedy about what it takes to re-route your life – and what happens when the wheels come off.

Announcing a new collaboration with City Stage Co

The Lyric Stage Company of Boston and City Stage Co. have announced a new collaboration, along with their plan to merge this season. This union will bring together two companies with decades of experience in theatre and theatre-based education. Working together, more youth and families in the City of Boston will have access to their programs.

Read More

Win Lunch with Spiro!

Update! Thank you so mucht to everyone who entered– we have a winner!

Congratulations to Vicki Kaplan who won our Kander & Ebb contest and lunch with Spiro! We loved your enthusiasm for Cell Block Tango and all of Kander and Ebb and can’t wait to share Kiss of the Spider Woman with you!

Read More

Director Rachel Bertone’s Passion for Incredible Stories

Kiss of the Spider Woman director Rachel Bertone has a history of taking incredible musicals and turning them into unmissable experiences.  Here are just a few of our favorites!

Kimberly Fife, Katrina Pavao, Phil Tayler, Joy Clark and Caroline Workman in Cabaret. Photo by Sharman Altshuler.

From DigBoston’s Review of Moonbox’s production of Cabaret:

Taking on iconic material is always a risky thing, particularly something as well known and oft revived as Cabaret. But if there’s anything the 1966 masterwork has demonstrated over the years, it’s that it is not a musical resistant to reinvention. (Bob Fosse proved this with his 1972 film adaptation, as did Sam Mendes and Rob Marshall with their landmark 1998 revival). And while Moonbox Productions’ brand-new revival of Cabaret, running through April 28 at the Calderwood Pavilion, isn’t conceptually much different (they are using the 1998 version of the script, after all), it is full of such startlingly original moments that the whole experience feels brand new.

It is without an ounce of hyperbole that I say that this searing revival of Cabaret, directed and choreographed by the extraordinary Rachel Bertone, is the best theatrical production so far this year. What’s more, it’s the best Boston-born revival of a musical in recent memory.

There is hardly a scrap of this production that feels routine, which is part of the reason that it feels so fresh. Despite polite nods to the choreography of Fosse and Marshall (Those elbows! Those ankles!), the staging is new and inventive without being derivative.

The cast of In the Heights. Photo by Glenn Cook

The Boston Globe’s Review of Wheelock Family Theater’s In the Heights

With its teeming canvas, incisive character portraits, and a gem-studded score that blends hip-hop and salsa with Broadway balladry, “In the Heights’’ showcased elements of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s signature style years before he built the blockbuster “Hamilton’’ on the foundation of similar creative components.

But even though “In the Heights’’ is probably destined to be remembered as Miranda’s other musical, a full-throttle production at Wheelock Family Theatre, superbly directed and choreographed by Rachel Bertone, offers a dazzling reminder that this was no mere warm-up exercise for Miranda.

Director Rachel Bertone sponsored by 

Learn More About Kiss of the Spider Woman

Director Rachel Bertone on Kiss of the Spider Woman & Why We’re Performing It Now

We sat down with Kiss of the Spider Woman Director Rachel Bertone for the first installment of our new series: Why3, a directorial take on why this production is important, why it should be performed at the Lyric Stage, and why we should see it now.

Why this play?

  • We need to see more representation of queer people of color on our stages.
  • We need to give a voice to minority groups who are oppressed and seemingly powerless.
  • To show us that toxic masculinity is a learned behavior and that love and knowledge can overpower it.
  • To remind us that love is what we are born with, fear is what we learn, and love is the ultimate cure for fear.

Why the Lyric Stage?

  • Because Lyric’s mission of diversity and inclusion allows us to cast the show accurately and tell the story truthfully.
  • Because Lyric’s intimate space forces us to closely examine and reflect upon the challenging themes and subject matter of the play. (i.e. homophobia, toxic masculinity and discrimination)

Why now?

  • We need this play right now because we must be able to turn to our fellow neighbor and love them despite our differences in race, gender, politics, and beliefs. We need to show compassion and empathy for everyone around us for we never truly know someone’s whole story. We must not be bystanders anymore—we must be UPstanders.

 

Director Rachel Bertone sponsored by 

 

Learn More About Kiss of the Spider Woman

If you’re a furloughed federal worker, come see a show on us. Bring your federal ID or proof of employment 30 minutes before any performance and we’ll give you a pair of tickets as long as we have space.